Home > Internet Ruminations > How to Understand Your Pastor

How to Understand Your Pastor

Pastors are an odd bunch.  Sometimes it’s difficult to understand what motivates them.  Some preachers try to rely on the coolest new technology to improve their preaching.  They might try to fit in by using local lingo, like finding out what name people use for soft-drinks according to this map.  They might try to craft their sermons more like Eminem, whom Nick calls the best lyricist in the past decade (and also the latest celebrity who thinks we care which candidate he endorses).  Scott at Scotteriology routinely makes fun of bad preachers.

I think Scott is generally a little too harsh on prosperity preachers.  I preached my own version of a prosperity message when I was the fill-in preacher last Sunday at church.  I tried to be “fair and balanced”.  Let me know what you think.  You can get my free mp3 sermon on the book of 3 John, entitled How to Walk in Overwhelming Prosperity.  I may incline toward heady theology and such, but I still believe in a supernatural gospel, even when it gets criticized as the “health and wealth gospel“.  (I also believe that if you put “free mp3” in a blog post, you are likely to get more traffic from Google searches.)

Being a pastor is difficult.  It doesn’t take long being in Christian circles until you start to see pastors dropping like flies.  Check out this amazing post about why pastors leave the ministry.  Though there are parts I disagree with, it does a great job of shedding light on why it’s so difficult to be a pastor.  In general, we’re all looking for real community in our churches, pastor or not.  That’s why I love the idea of making our churches become more like bars.  So do me a favor: stop treating your pastor like a politician to sit in judgment over, or as the guy to call every three days with your new crisis.  Treat him like the bartender or even the guy sitting on the stool next to you.  Be a blessing and you will be blessed in return.

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Categories: Internet Ruminations
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